BACK TO HOME PAGE

International
Mutoscope
Shoot-o-Matic  I'll pay $3000!!!


Westerns' Baseball  I'll pay $1000!!

Jimmy Johnson, owner of Western Equipment and Supply loved a good gamble.  That's why he started his coin op company, and also why virtually all the company's games had cash payout features for high scores.  So when they decided to make a baseball game, it should at least have an optional payout attachment.  Pete Rose would have loved it!  Western's Baseball of 1938 was a pioneer in one important aspect: they resurrected a feature used in an earlier pinball game Stop and Sock, which was the under the playfield pitch unit.  This became the standard on most coin op baseball games made through the 1970's. 

email: coinoplibrary@comcast.net

Mills Wizard Fortune Teller  I'll pay $1000!!

In the 1910's Mills Novelty made an early floor model spinning dial fortune teller.  Then they made a countertop wood case model, the Wizard in the early 1920's.  Then they made the final and best model, an aluminum cast front Wizard in 1926.  You could select one of six questions, such as What will my future wife/husband look like?, How can I get rich?, etc.  You then inserted a penny, pushed the plunger, and your answer was revealed in the open window.  The front casting is what gives this game such a great look, with the wizard and his smoking incense pot.  And of course, the Mills owl logo down below. 

Chicago Coin Midget Skee Ball  I'll pay $3000!!

United Star Slugger I'll pay $1000-2000!!!

Toward the end of WW2, two old pros in the coin machine business, Harry Williams, and Lyndon Durant got together and formed United Manufacturing(United--get it?).  Since their first efforts were done under wartime restrictions: read-no metal for parts, they were fairly simple machines.  This did get the company on its feet for the big post war surge however.  Two great minds can't always think alike though, so the two went their separate ways, with Durant staying with United, and Williams forming the new Williams Electronics.  United became a big player in the industry, with their forte being bowling games.  When, in the 1950's they decided to go into baseball game  production, who better to copy than Williams, whose baseball games were the gold standard?  Harry Williams even let his friend use the man running unit, which had animated runners running the bases to show the batters' position.  United made an impressive game, with three different decks to hit to, making it a real challenge to play.  United Star Slugger and Super Slugger both came out in 1955, a good year for coin op baseball!

BACK TO HOME PAGE

email: coinoplibrary@comcast.net